Houndmouth
Cat's Cradle
February 23, 2019

Venue

Cat's Cradle
300 East Main St., Carrboro, NC, 27510, US

Date

Saturday, February 23, 2019
8:30 PM


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Houndmouth on Thrillcall: concerts, tour dates, & shows
Houndmouth

Houndmouth Biography

That first November 2011 night, when it all fell together at the Green House, was nothing more complicated than four friends playing music, armed with something to drink and a curiosity about what might happen. They were the generation who has come of age in the new economy, already adept at shuffling jobs and get-bys, firmly acclimated to the diminished expectations that come with growing up somewhere the rest of the world assumes is nowhere. Which, in this case, is New Albany, Indiana. Houndmouth, then, knew each other from...around. Matt Myers and Zak Appleby had played in cover bands together for years, schooled in blues and classic rock and Motown, toughened by indifferent audiences and the clatter of empty bottles. Matt and Katie Toupin had worked as an acoustic duo for three years, when she wasn't on the road tending to a straight job. Katie and Shane Cody had gone to high school together, before Shane disappeared off to Chicago and New York to study audio engineering. In the beginning it was Shane and Matt who'd started knocking around at first, just drums and guitar, once Shane got home and free of a brief bluegrass flirtation. The rest happened in a tumble, Zak and Katie switching from guitars to bass and keyboards, respectively. Four months later, their homemade EP in hand, Houndmouth made the pilgrimage to South By Southwest. Their booking agent convinced Rough Trade's Geoff Travis to come have a listen. Of such things are dreams made. Months of conversation and a proper studio later, their debut album, From the Hills Below the City, will be released by Rough Trade. "We lucked out," Matt says. "We knew we were making good music. We knew we had something. But we didn't know it would escalate so quickly. Always the element of luck." Before and after that bit of luck, Houndmouth have been on the road, building their audience. Working. Opening for the Drive-By Truckers, the Lumineers, the Alabama Shakes, Lucero, and Grace Potter and the Nocturnals. Headlining on their own. Turning heads. "You know good art when you see it," says Newport Folk Festival booker Jay Sweet, an early adopter, "and you know good food when you taste it. Well, you also know good music when you hear it, and when I first heard Houndmouth it was like freshest tasting art I had heard in many moons. A true musical omnivore's delight." "I'm going down where nobody knows me," they sing during the jaunty chorus of "On the Road." The opening track to From the Hills Below the City, which is more or less the relationship New Albany has to Louisville, across the river: "I had a job had to leave behind me...I had to move to another city." A two and a half minute slightly bent pop confection, conscious of all kinds of music which went before. Self-conscious about nothing, not even the neo-rap cutting contest that snaps across one break. A blues for now, then. Houndmouth's songs emerge with a loose-limbed swing, anchored by a sturdy rhythm and a cagey melodic sensibility. "Penitentiary," revived from Matt and Katie's acoustic days, is all dressed up as a rock anthem. It's dark, yet fun, with all those voices singing, "come on down to the Penitentiary/oh mama, the law came crashing down on me." So are the songs. Deeply emotional, that weird, powerful, essential thing the blues does that makes you feel better through the tears. Especially the songs which are deeply personal, like "Halfway to Hardinsburg" or "Palmyra." Or the sad, slurring loss of "Long as You're Home," on which they sing, "Who am I supposed to be?" Themselves, of course. Four musicians from New Albany, Indiana, across the river from Louisville. Where Will Oldham, Jim James, and Freakwater's Catherine Irwin live. A fecund place, and place matters. Not a sound, not a scene, but a place. A real place. "There is a familiar element about My Morning Jacket that I can't really pinpoint," Katie says. "It's kinda like what I can't pinpoint about what Houndmouth is that we all sort of get. It just makes us feel at home."